Archaeology & Environmentalism
richiedcruz:

Realities of the job: There was a time, when I would read a news story about a pipeline or solar plant and it was just a story.
Then I started working as a CRM archaeologist. Now I look at articles about solar plants and the like and wonder how much work someone got from them, or why can’t environmentalist shut up, because people are counting on these things for work…

Thought of this post in light of the newest Keystone XL-related news.

richiedcruz:

Realities of the job: There was a time, when I would read a news story about a pipeline or solar plant and it was just a story.

Then I started working as a CRM archaeologist. Now I look at articles about solar plants and the like and wonder how much work someone got from them, or why can’t environmentalist shut up, because people are counting on these things for work…

Thought of this post in light of the newest Keystone XL-related news.

terrypbrock:

My view for the day at the screen. #archaeology #archoffice #fieldtechlife  (Taken with instagram)

Sorry if this is boring, but it’s always interesting to me how various people and companies go about the same basic procedures differently… I’m used to hand-shaking screens, but this looks so much more efficient!

terrypbrock:

My view for the day at the screen. #archaeology #archoffice #fieldtechlife (Taken with instagram)

Sorry if this is boring, but it’s always interesting to me how various people and companies go about the same basic procedures differently… I’m used to hand-shaking screens, but this looks so much more efficient!

"Provenience: The precise location where an artifact or archaeological sample was recovered archaeologically. 
Provenance: The detailed history of where an artifact has been since its creation. 

Take as an example a Roman coin. The provenance of that coin could include its creation in a mint in Italy, its loss in a shipwreck off Alexandria, its recovery by shell divers, its purchase first by an antiques dealer, then by a tourist who left it to her son who eventually sold it to a museum. The artifact’s archaeological provenience would be the location in the shipwreck where it was found. 

When archaeologists lament about the loss of provenience from a looted art object, what we really mean is that part of the provenance has been lost—we are interested in how the coin got from the Roman mint into the museum; while art historians don’t really care, since they can generally figure out what mint a coin came from. … provenance for an art historian is important to establish ownership, but provenance is interesting to an archaeologist to establish meaning. 

As reader Eric P so elegantly put it, provenience is an artifact’s birthplace, while provenance is an artifact’s resume.”

How do I know when I should quit digging for the day?

jangojips:

When this happens. Am I right, archies?

I found the original 10yr munsell sheet on google images. I modified it and added the trowel. Just a clarification.

spiritfall-commune:

Archaeology Anthem

spiritfall-commune:

Archaeology Anthem

Census Declares Thousands of China’s Heritage Sites “Disappeared”

archaeologicalnews:

The results are in from China’s most recent national heritage census — the first in more than 20 years — and they’re not good.

According to the State Administration of Cultural Heritage (SACH), around 44,000 of China’s 766,722 registered heritage sites have completely disappeared, while approximately a quarter of those remaining are either “poorly preserved” or “in a state of disrepair.”  No sites were specifically mentioned in the census, but the study included ancient ruins, temples and other cultural relics.

According to Liu Xiaohe, deputy director of the survey, economic construction is among the biggest reasons for the destruction.  Many of the vanished sites were completely unprotected or ignored by protection units overseeing national and provincial cultural relics, thereby allowing their demolition in favor of construction projects.  In addition, some heritage sites were destroyed without explanation. Read more.

thearchaeologistinthetardis:

Putting together our dig kits.

thearchaeologistinthetardis:

Putting together our dig kits.

This!

ruralarchaeologist:

Is our video blog. It’s boring. Don’t follow. Unless you, you know, like awkward archaeologists.

Except seriously follow this blog. I love this blog.

CRM archaeology

mukurogirl:

A few things my first five weeks working as a CRM archaeologist have taught me:

  1. The art of climbing over or shimmying under old barbed wire or electric fences
  2. Cross country hiking is A LOT of hard work.
  3. Wearing the proper footwear results in less tired and achy feet. Plush less fumbling and stumbling around for footing
  4. Never start your weekend drinking early. Hiking while hungover is never fun
  5. Always have good friends to hang with
  6. If you don’t wear your orange safety vest hunters and irate land owners can get away with shooting you in court
  7. Sometimes you gotta pull over for an hour long lunch to keep from coming in from work too early
  8. The art of scoping out a good place to pee in the woods
  9. Bring toilet paper!
  10. Love your job! Take the good with the bad.

Every single one of these things are accurate. I love this list.

richiedcruz:

Gear: Cheat Sheets
When I find one I like, I get it laminated. They last longer that way.

Great idea!

richiedcruz:

Gear: Cheat Sheets

When I find one I like, I get it laminated. They last longer that way.

Great idea!